Archive for the 'governence' Category

30
Aug
11

Anna Bhai, Gandhigiri and Us

Published in bdnews24.com on August 31, 2011

The arrival of Anna bhai and his ‘Gandhigiri’, ironically copying a Bollywood storyline of Munna bhai and his embracing of Gandhi in dealing with national problem, has undoubtedly captured the imagination of the world. But not everybody is a fan. Arundhati Roy has almost called him a fake and the people who are seething in anger are just staying quiet for the right time to criticise him. But Anna Hazare definitely has arrived with Indian media and the middle-class hailing him as the new Messiah.

My prediction: this jubilation will be short lived and Team Anna will regularly venture into territories which will become problematic for democratic governance. However, even though I think his solutions are not well thought through (such sweeping power to an unelected body can never be good for democracy), he deserves a huge bow. At the least, the movement has made certain section of the citizens feel empowered and created a huge demand for change from the way business is being done. That is no small feat.

Continue reading ‘Anna Bhai, Gandhigiri and Us’

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13
Mar
09

Violence is not the only way to be heard

Published in Guardian Cif ;

After the border guards’ mutiny, Bangladeshi politicians have to ensure disgruntled sections of society feel they have a voice.

It has been two weeks since the ghastly Pilkhana massacre in Bangladesh, and the brutality of the incident has been so traumatising that Bangladeshis are still searching for answers and closure. Inside the headquarter of the border security guards (BDR) of Bangladesh, soldiers revolted against their superior officers. The subsequent discovery of execution-style murders, torture and rape has put the idea that this revolt was merely about pay into serious doubt.

 

Read more here

20
Feb
08

Say no to national security council

Published in the New Age (02 Feb 2008)

In countries where strong democratic institutions exist and where the military has never offered any threat to take over the state machinery, NSC has been used to deal with external threats and coordinate defence strategies. However, in countries where the military has been a dominant force in internal politics, NSC has been used to institutionalise the military’s role in politics, writes Asif Saleh

Jillur Ahmed, Channel I host of Tritiyo Matra: So is National Security Council coming?
General Moeen U Ahmed: Well, we have been hearing about it since last year. Let’s see. It’s there in India and Pakistan – so why not in Bangladesh?

Continue reading ‘Say no to national security council’




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